Dublin Jet Bridge Rips Door Off of American Airlines Boeing 787-8

by Anthony Losanno

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A jet bridge collapsed and ripped the door off of a Philadelphia-bound Boeing 787-8 this morning. Flight AA723 was supposed to fly from Dublin Airport (DUB) to Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) today, but when the attached jet bridge collapsed, the plane’s second door got caught and fell to the ground.

It’s crazy to see an aircraft door lying on the ground. Luckily, there were no injuries reported as passengers and crew were not onboard at the time of the incident.

AA723

Needless to say, the flight could not proceed without a door and was cancelled.

American 787-8

American Airlines released the following statement:

An American Airlines aircraft was damaged due to a jet bridge malfunction at Dublin Airport (DUB). No customers or crew were on board at the time and there were no reported injuries. We are sending a replacement aircraft to operate Flight 723, with service from DUB to PHL, which is now expected to depart tomorrow afternoon. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and thank our team for their professionalism.”

Anthony’s Take: This is a freak accident. I’ve seen many gate agents struggle with the jet bridge before, but this takes it to another level. Luckily, there were no injuries. This should take some time to repair.

(Featured Image Credit: Lorcan Meehan/Facebook.)

(H/T: One Mile at a Time.)

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14 comments

jsm July 9, 2023 - 12:00 pm

Considering the carbon fiber construction of a 787, is this damage in fact reparable?

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Billy Bob July 9, 2023 - 3:22 pm

I’ll get that damned door open. Hold my beer.

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Brian Wagner July 10, 2023 - 4:02 am

Now all Southwest Airlines Ramp agents will be required to watch a training video on jet bridge safety. It’s always the ramps fault. (sarcasm)

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Ele July 11, 2023 - 2:24 pm

In fact ramp (or operator) should double check the auto-level is ok….just had two malfunctions WITH alarm…got the door closed or ready to be and restarted procedure…the wheel/sensor was not in place, second chance…bomp…the wheel finally “fell in place” (touching the aircraft/activating).
Months ago similar accident…door “arms” to be replaced :-[

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Phil Blinkhorn July 10, 2023 - 7:03 am

In 1997 at Washington Dulles a Virgin 747 to London I was about to take received a hole in the fuselage when the airbridge ran away. The hole was patched overnight and we departed 14 hours late. I doubt AA will have the services of that 787 for some time!

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Frank July 10, 2023 - 7:14 am

That is a very good question. I would be very Interested in reviewing the repair process.
But some how I don’t think is in the Boeing repair manual.

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KW July 10, 2023 - 7:54 am

In the local news, jet bridge operator and diversity hire, Mike Oxmall, says he is happy with his new job, especially now the he can draw disability for the incident which will cause him great distress.

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VZ July 10, 2023 - 1:39 pm

wow, diversity hire? weirdly bigoted comment

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JT July 11, 2023 - 4:28 pm

he’ll tell you he’s not racist either.

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John Henry July 10, 2023 - 6:17 pm

HO de do I’m coming!

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Patrick Birmingham July 10, 2023 - 8:05 pm

I’m sure an AME will be in contact with Boeing. The repair, NDT, and replacement will not happen overnight. Its good news no one was injured.

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Wile E. Coyote July 10, 2023 - 9:06 pm

Methinks Mick had a wee bit too much Guinness before going to work that day.

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Enjoy Fine Food July 11, 2023 - 10:58 am

l’d like the hull number of that AA 787 so I can add it to my “Do Not Fly” list.

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Ele July 11, 2023 - 2:04 pm

Yep….the bridge destroted the two “branches” holding the door open or closed to be locked before flight….but damage and time to fix, check and release…
whoaaa €€€€€€€€€€€€€€€
It happens that auto-level (authomatic system adapting the bridge to aircraft height malfunctions)….sensors should give ALARM!!!

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